What works, what doesn’t : study techniques

I’ve been trying to decipher the original academic paper on this but have found the authors have written a more pupil/teacher friendly version for Scientific American Mind.

I’m going to bring this to our next department meeting-more to raise awareness (I’m a sucker for proper academic research in education) and also publish it on one of our display boards. I am hoping it will really help when our year 11 move on to more revision timetables.

For reference: original academic article is here.

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Fun Absorbing Experiment for kids

Fun Absorbing Experiment for kids.

Sugar Cube Absorbing

I found this through pinterest, simply by the image of three sugar cubes and it got me to wondering… Could this be used to measure a rate? Depending on what the tallest tower is that can be built without the bottom cube collapsing, could you make a stack in a coloured water and time when the colour reaches the end/beginning of a new cube? If you could get to 5, would that be enough points for a graph?

British Science Week – Activity Packs

From 13th to 22nd March, it is British Science Week and a page of Activity Packs has been produced by the British Science Association, linking to 15 short activities, arranged by age that can be done to celebrate British Science Week.

There is also a flyer that can be printed, and a collection of curriculum links that apply to the under 11 and 11 – 16 year old activities.

Some of the activities included are building a giant egg timer (prepare in advance with multiple 2 litre plastic bottles!), battery building (not too different to the fruit battery testing that our own STEM group did), wireless signal blockade (handy if you have the right equipment and are allowed to use your phone in a classroom), metallic food (separation techniques, magnetism and easy to do at home as a nice food comparison), and many others.

I think it would be nice to give a class or STEM group their choice over which practical they’d like to do and to work their way through a selection of them. That’s why I’m going to post this earlier than British Science Week – to get you ready and prepared!

I might also keep this list handy to try some at home in a few years!

Learning Activity: Bulb Growth Chart

Learning Activity: Bulb Growth Chart.

This sounds like an amazing fun little “at home” activity – measuring the growth of a plant. I wonder if you could also measure the root growth? I know that they tend to be windier and far more tangled, but maybe an approximate growth?

I also love the idea given in the post about looking for patterns of growth and comparing different plants. We have windows facing east and west, would that create a difference in growth rates? It would be good for a Biology Plants unit and for STEM.

It should even work for cress in a test tube (that way you don’t have to worry quite so much about remembering to water them!) over a few weeks perhaps.

Wall-Size Periodic Table | Stark Science

Wall-Size Periodic Table | Stark Science.

When I first got sent this link, I thought it meant just a large periodic table, but no! This link gives you the tools to print your own WALL size periodic table – each element is printed on one page of A4 and all of the files you need to create it are available on the link.

There’s even a two elements to a page document if you don’t have a very big wall.

I desperately want to see classroom walls covered in this now!

These could even be used as project prompts or for display boards.