TED-Ed and Periodic Videos

TED-Ed and Periodic Videos.

This specific link to TED-Ed shows a periodic table, where every single element has a video link! The videos are from the University of Nottingham and all subtitled, varying in length and type of content. Randomly, I watched the videos on Mercury, Molybdenum and Oxygen. Molybdenum’s was only about a minute long, Oxygen was 6 minutes. They were all very informative, with Mercury and Oxygen having some “fun” science being shown in them so obviously it will all depend on which elements can have more visual content.

But, if you ever need to start off a bit of research on an element, or to prepare a lesson on one (especially a rarer one), this is the perfect starting location. Where else would you learn the meaning behind Mad as a Hatter?

Scibermonkey

This is a pretty nifty, colourful little collection of resources.

Resources are separated into different age ranges: 5-7, 7-11, 11-14, 14-16 and teachers with all of the ranges having different topics to select.

Sciber Monkey

For example, using the teacher section, there are 3 drop down menus for age of student, theme and then topic. This is the same structure if you went on the 11-14 page, but far less colourful!

Scibermonkey itself is very colourful and fun looking, especially to entice those younger into having a look, but then all of the resources are links to elsewhere – games, animations, BBC Bitesize information, diagrams to label. They are all interesting and useful, but each resource could be from a different website that isn’t quite as fun and colourful as the Sciber Monkey site. It is very easily searchable by keywords though, which is always a good positive!

British Science Week – Activity Packs

From 13th to 22nd March, it is British Science Week and a page of Activity Packs has been produced by the British Science Association, linking to 15 short activities, arranged by age that can be done to celebrate British Science Week.

There is also a flyer that can be printed, and a collection of curriculum links that apply to the under 11 and 11 – 16 year old activities.

Some of the activities included are building a giant egg timer (prepare in advance with multiple 2 litre plastic bottles!), battery building (not too different to the fruit battery testing that our own STEM group did), wireless signal blockade (handy if you have the right equipment and are allowed to use your phone in a classroom), metallic food (separation techniques, magnetism and easy to do at home as a nice food comparison), and many others.

I think it would be nice to give a class or STEM group their choice over which practical they’d like to do and to work their way through a selection of them. That’s why I’m going to post this earlier than British Science Week – to get you ready and prepared!

I might also keep this list handy to try some at home in a few years!

Wall-Size Periodic Table | Stark Science

Wall-Size Periodic Table | Stark Science.

When I first got sent this link, I thought it meant just a large periodic table, but no! This link gives you the tools to print your own WALL size periodic table – each element is printed on one page of A4 and all of the files you need to create it are available on the link.

There’s even a two elements to a page document if you don’t have a very big wall.

I desperately want to see classroom walls covered in this now!

These could even be used as project prompts or for display boards.

Christmas STEAM Advent Calendar: 25 Days of Learning Play – Left Brain Craft Brain

A quick little pinterest search and I came across this list of 24 STEAM based ideas and I wanted to share it before I made my way through the list looking at which ones I want to do (either at home or at work!). I wasn’t even searching for anything Christmassy! And now I possibly won’t have to due to using  Left Brain Craft Brain’s already compiled list! Especially as it includes Art with the usual STEM subjects.

Christmas STEAM Advent Calendar: 25 Days of Learning Play – Left Brain Craft Brain.

And, yes, I know it’s a few days early, and not quite December yet, but people need to plan!

Merry Christmas!

The Chemistry of The Colours of Blood | Compound Interest

The Chemistry of The Colours of Blood | Compound Interest.

Okay, I’m officially in love with this website! I refuse to go back further in their history though as I think I will just blog it all! Haha! This link though is all about blood colour. As with the last post, I love the poster image they have and can see that being on display either at Halloween (as they’ve suggested) or simply at any time of year!

I’d like to see violet blood!

Particles in Motion – National STEM Centre

Particles in Motion – National STEM Centre.

This is a collection of interactive materials that was published by the Royal Society of Chemistry a few years ago. You will have to register with the National Stem Centre (but you should do this anyway as there are many more resources available on here!)

It’s just under 400MB file so will take a little while to download. You will then have to unzip the file and run through your PC (you may need a bit of IT support to get it working). It’s proved so popular at our school, we have installed it onto every teachers PC so it can be projected onto their IWB.

It comprises animations, slideshows and videos on the following topics:
States of Matter
Melting
Boiling
Freezing
Sublimation
Kinetic Theory
Diffusion
Condensing
Distillation
Fractional Distillation
Dissolving
Filtration
Chromatography