How to Make Shaving Cream Easter Egg Dye

This is how you can make some awesome marbleized looking Easter Eggs quickly and easily, without a lot of mess and spending a lot of money. Here’s what

Source: How to Make Shaving Cream Easter Egg Dye

I found a link on pinterest the other day that I just thought “Ooh, eggs and shaving foam”, pinning it for another day. Then I thought, let’s actually look at the method! It looks so, so simple. We’ve been planning on trying to make natural dyes (raspberries, coffee, etc) to paint some eggs here in school, but this method is much simpler and easier to put together.

In fact, I’ve put the ingredients on my shopping list to try at home!

Happy Easter!

Fun Science Experiment! – Learning how plants absorb water! –

Coloured Cabbage Leaves

Fun Science Experiment! – Learning how plants absorb water! –.

I want to bring this blog to note because I think it would be far more cost effective when we usually demonstrate how plants absorb water. Normally, we buy a bunch of flowers and either put them all in one vase of artificially coloured water, or separate them between two colours. Normally only blue and red. We might also do the same with a packet of celery. Celery is good because you can cut the stem and see the colour going all the way through.

However, I was drawn to this particular blog and the idea from a photo of cabbage leaves in different coloured water. With celery, only blue and red ever tend to really work, visibly. Well, Paging Fun Mums has clearly got red, blue, green and yellow to work amazingly well with cabbage leaves. I also think that it would be far easier to ensure a whole class could set up their own set as a cabbage would go further than a bunch of flowers. They were apparently only left overnight, which is probably what we would do.

I just really want to try the cabbage!

Balloon Greenhouse | Activity | Education.com

Growing Balloons

Balloon Greenhouse | Activity | Education.com.

I found this on pinterest and am so intrigued to see how well this works. Ellen, the author, suggests using radish seeds, but I’m wondering if in a STEM environment it might be more useful and cost effective to use cress seeds. We’ll have to try it out with that.

I love the fact that you tie off and make a contained “world” within the balloon. I can imagine asking a group what a plant needs to grow and then asking them if the seeds have all of that inside of the balloon.

I also love the idea of also growing the plant outside of the balloon, to see how the balloon affects the growth.

Could this also work on a larger scale to demo phototropism? Paint the balloon all over, or on one side. Or just use a dark coloured balloon.

I seriously cannot wait to try this!

And of course, this experiment is perfectly suited to be done at home – that’s what Ellen did. We’re just going to adapt it for inside of education. Or try to!

How to Make Magnetic Slime – Frugal Fun For Boys

Homemade Magnetic Slime

How to Make Magnetic Slime – Frugal Fun For Boys.

I’m sure that most science departments have a whole array of magnetic toys, we certainly have – we may even have some magnetic slime. However, to be able to make more of the stuff? Even use it as part of a STEM session or get prospective students to make it on a school Open Evening… I think it would be pretty fun.

The ingredients are even simpler to buy if you have access to the school ordering system (at least for the iron oxide!) and who doesn’t have some PVA glue?

I think I’d want to try it out myself before I considered doing it at home with children — the iron oxide and breathing aspect makes me hesitant. I also prefer the idea of the slime over putty as think it would be more visual. Especially on an Open Evening in the Physics room!

Viscosity experiment for kids

Viscosity Testing

Viscosity experiment for kids.

This would be awfully messy to do at home, in school or as STEM, but isn’t science supposed to be messy and fun?

In the blog, different home-found liquids were used to test their viscosity in a simple ramp race. They used oil, water, passata, corn syrup, treacle and ice cream sauce. I love those options! I might change passata for ketchup and try other table sauces, too, even possibly different brands of one table sauce. Just to stretch the STEM Club into thinking a bit harder! It’ll be just as messy as the syrup one we currently do (syrup at room temperature, from the fridge and warmed in boiling water), but maybe a little bit less sticky. Plus, table sauces come in squeezy bottles and are relatively cheap for all of the waste that will come with it!

Does Aspirin Help Plants Grow? | Education.com

Does Aspirin Help Plants Grow? | Education.com.

I found this on a random google search where I was actually looking for something else and I know that I have found a few plant growth topics, but this one is a bit different.

The standard practice in schools to test plant growth is to use nutrient deficient solutions on already grown plants, or on cress, and we often find that we don’t get amazing results. Through mainly pinterest, I have found “at home” versions where you use water, salt water, sugar water, vinegar, etc – common household liquids. Obviously, if you’re trying to teach the science behind the nutrients themselves that are needed, the “at home” versions won’t help.

If, however, you just want to introduce how plants grow rather than what they need nutrient-wise to grow, then this newly found solution can easily be added on: aspirin!

Apparently there is loads of research into how aspirin can help tomato plants, but this “science fair” topic is about testing aspirin to see if helps plants grow. This would be a lovely add on to the other household liquids that cress seeds could be grown with.

You just have to be careful with the aspirin when it comes to children. Definitely one to add on to the to-do list!

Fun Absorbing Experiment for kids

Fun Absorbing Experiment for kids.

Sugar Cube Absorbing

I found this through pinterest, simply by the image of three sugar cubes and it got me to wondering… Could this be used to measure a rate? Depending on what the tallest tower is that can be built without the bottom cube collapsing, could you make a stack in a coloured water and time when the colour reaches the end/beginning of a new cube? If you could get to 5, would that be enough points for a graph?

British Science Week – Activity Packs

From 13th to 22nd March, it is British Science Week and a page of Activity Packs has been produced by the British Science Association, linking to 15 short activities, arranged by age that can be done to celebrate British Science Week.

There is also a flyer that can be printed, and a collection of curriculum links that apply to the under 11 and 11 – 16 year old activities.

Some of the activities included are building a giant egg timer (prepare in advance with multiple 2 litre plastic bottles!), battery building (not too different to the fruit battery testing that our own STEM group did), wireless signal blockade (handy if you have the right equipment and are allowed to use your phone in a classroom), metallic food (separation techniques, magnetism and easy to do at home as a nice food comparison), and many others.

I think it would be nice to give a class or STEM group their choice over which practical they’d like to do and to work their way through a selection of them. That’s why I’m going to post this earlier than British Science Week – to get you ready and prepared!

I might also keep this list handy to try some at home in a few years!